Body scanners opt out intimidating

EPIC said that the program is "unlawful, invasive, and ineffective." EPIC argued that the federal agency has violated the Administrative Procedures Act, the Privacy Act, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, and the Fourth Amendment.EPIC cited the invasive nature of the devices, the TSA's disregard of public opinion, and the impact on religious freedom.Interestingly, the name “John” seems to increase one’s likelihood of making a stand: John “Don’t Touch My Junk” Tyner, John “You Don’t Need My ID” Gilmore, yours truly Jon Corbett (if I do say so myself! In April 2012, Brennan found himself at Portland’s airport, opting-out of the scanner and allowing the TSA to pat him down. Supreme Court has squarely rejected “contempt of cop” laws, whereby those who do not “obey” random orders of police officers can be fined. For the foregoing reasons, the Court should decline to allow the TSA to become a discount legislator, police officer, prosecutor, judge, and jury, and accordingly set aside the order levying a fine against John Brennan.“Jon Corbett is a civil rights advocate known for filing the first lawsuit against the deployment of TSA nude body scanners, as well as defeating the body scanners live in ‘How to Get ANYTHING Through TSA Nude Body Scanners.’ Presently a law student, he continues to advocate for travel and privacy rights.But, upon the completion of the pat-down, the screener tested his gloves for explosive residue, resulting in a false-positive. Twitter: @_Jon Corbett, Web:https://professional-troublemaker.com/“ When the TSA announced in 2015 that for “some passengers” they were eliminating the body scanner opt-out option, which allowed passengers to be screened via pat-down instead of body scanner, they phrased it as follows: “TSA is updating the AIT PIA to reflect a change to the operating protocol regarding the ability of individuals to opt opt-out of AIT screening in favor of physical screening.This blog began in 2010 to document my lawsuit against the beginning of the TSA’s body scanner program.From that time until 2015, the body scanner was “optional” for all passengers — so long as you didn’t mind being molested by a blue-gloved screener during their “full-body pat-downs.” This was part of the reason that no court has struck down these body scanners as unconstitutional: because, they say, passengers are to use them (even though that “consent” is coerced by offering the alternatives of “let us touch your junk” or “don’t fly”).What press reports failed to mention was the fact that the TSA signed a much larger 5 million dollar contract with American Science and Engineering, Inc. The press release concerning the contract outlines how AS&E will provide the TSA with “Smart Check® Advanced Imaging Technology.” One look at AS&E’s website confirms that the technology is primarily used in “backscatter” x-ray body scanners for airports that emit “ionizing radiation.” A promotional video posted on You Tube also shows AS&E Vice President Joseph Reiss talking about how the company has perfected “back-scatter imaging” using x-rays and is also providing the Department of Homeland Security with backscatter vans that can roam highways and conduct drive-by scans, which was also reported by Forbes in 2010.The only difference between Rapiscan’s body scanners and those developed by American Science and Engineering, Inc.

The company could be fined and barred from participating in government contracts, or employees could face prison terms if it is found to have defrauded the government. Will they get retrofitted with "privacy software", and then re-deployed?

EPIC has filed a lawsuit to suspend the deployment of body scanners at US airports, pending an independent review.

Body scanners produce detailed, three-dimensional images of individuals.

In all, the 250 Rapiscan machines already deployed are to be phased out of airports nationwide and will be replaced with machines produced by L-3 Communications. But, more importantly, it's a big win because the TSA is actually taking privacy seriously. • January 21, 2013 AM So does anybody know how the images are stored and processed in the L-3 machines?

TSA has contracted with L-3, Smiths Group Plc (SMIN) and American Science & Engineering Inc. It seems like perhaps I should end my opposition to body scanners, except I'm concerned that the raw images of naked people may be stored somewhere and be theoretically accessible.

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